when entitlement whiners attack.

That salty scent you can smell in the air this morning?  That’s the smell of millions of hippie tears, wafting over from the Left Coast, where the students of UC Berkeley demonstrate that Economics isn’t much in demand at their institution.

Look, kids: your home state is broke as shit.  It’s broke because you folks voted yourself free everything with crunchy gratis glaze and no-cost sprinkles on top, and even the super-sized tax rates your state collects aren’t enough to pay for everything.  The money to run stuff has to come from somewhere, and when your state cuts education budgets (see “broke as shit” above), then the only way to keep the lights on is by raising user fees.  But you go ahead and throw your hissy fits because you’re asked to pay for the services you’re receiving, and see how far the sympathy-o-meter gets pegged.  To me, it’s just another conclusive demonstration that your idea of taxation is “Free Means Free To Me”, and “Don’t tax you, don’t tax me, tax that fellow behind the tree.”

(On a side note: even after the rate hike, the bill for a semester at UC Berkeley is $10k per semester.  Compared to other universities in its weight class, that’s a screaming bargain.  Get a scholarship, get a side job, put some elbow grease into it…but stop whining about having to contribute to your world-class education what are basically slightly inflated community college fees in other parts of the country.)

21 thoughts on “when entitlement whiners attack.

  1. Lissa says:

    “Free Means Free To Me”, and “Don’t tax you, don’t tax me, tax that fellow behind the tree.”

    That is some HIGH quality sloganeering, right there!

  2. Weer'd Beard says:

    32%? Pshaw! What building should we “Take over” when New Hampshire raised non-resident carry permit fees from $20 to $100??

  3. Connie says:

    Totally agree with you. I graduated from UCLA (not quite as saturated with hippies as Berkeley, but close) a few years ago and am a little amazed at all the students protesting the tuition increase. At this point, there really is no other option other than to raise fees in order to keep the UC system running. The education I received was well worth the tuition, and if the situation had called for it, I would have willingly payed double (it’d still be cheaper than USC).

  4. STW says:

    The hoot is that this money is all labeled as “fees” not as tuition because they can’t charge tuition. A dollar is a dollar is a dollar no matter the label.
    The sad thing is is that I attended UC Davis in the early 1970’s for $1200 a year and it was a better school then than now. They ought to be mad that they are getting an inferior product.

  5. Kristopher says:

    I love it.

    A relative bought a mcmansion in a gated community in Palm Desert for a third of it’s original price as a vacation home … she ain’t going to live there enough to be a resident, of course.

    Keep driving people with income away … non-californians will continue to buy up the remains at pennies on the dollar.

  6. jimbob86 says:

    “Let’s put it this way: passing a college course no more indicates a human capital gain than just going to a gym indicates an improvement in physical fitness.”

    -from the linky DJK left

    “On a side note: even after the rate hike, the bill for a semester at UC Berkeley is $10k per semester. Compared to other universities in its weight class, that’s a screaming bargain.”

    -munchkin wrangler

    “In it’s weight class”…… hmmmmm . Intellectually speaking? I have to wonder the relative “weight class” of the “education” going
    on there if the student body can not understand basic economics.

  7. RevolverRob says:

    UCB’s is going down from Heavyweight to middle heavyweight at best. It’s now competing with excellent state level schools from across the nation who have spent considerable time and effort into building great programs. These states also aren’t “broke as shit”.

    I was amazed when I talked with a peer who works for UCB. Her description of funding for graduate students sent chills down my spine. The state of California and its citizens have not only compromised the state economy, but they have guaranteed that many, potentially great, minds will leave or stay away from the program. Thus, they will end up as the “bottom of the top” or great “has been” program in the U.S.

    Oh well.

    -Rob

  8. yorksranter says:

    You appear to have forgotten the CA Republicans’ campaign to eliminate the real estate tax, somehow.

    I wonder how that might have happened?

    • Marko Kloos says:

      Oh, I get it. The state has been Democrat-controlled for decades, but it’s the Republicans’ fault that the state is broke.

      Also, what are you taking about, anyway? What is a “real estate tax”? Are you talking about property tax (which CA most certainly still has?) Or the CA estate (“death”) tax, which has been phased out?

    • Mike says:

      And yet, the Democrats are the ones increasing spending AND taxes every year.. though they’re increasing the spending much faster than the taxes.

      CA definitely needs to lower taxes, and the last few “budget crises” were caused by the fact that the Republicans will dig in their heels in an attempt to reduce or at least freeze the spending. But no, the Democrats then say “oh noes! We can’t afford to pay the police and firemans because the evil Republicans don’t want us to!” Which is a lie – the Republicans want to cut the entitlements and certain non-vital state agencies to get the budget back to sane levels.

      I left CA recently, so I’m up on the situation there. If you want someone to blame, blame the Democrat socialists who call themselves “progressives”. The reason I left? If the socialists want a socialist state, they’re free to it. Just don’t bring that crap to Texas or things will get nasty.

    • Nathaniel says:

      yorksranter, I ask you this: if the property tax were tripled, would it permanently solve the budget crisis?

      I think we can both see that the answer is no. That’s because this crisis is a crisis of spending, not revenue. If you were to look at a family that bought plasma TVs, high-quality child care, nightly restaurant dinners, and risky stock purchases all on a single low-wage income, you would correctly deduce that the family needed to cut down on its spending before trying to increase its revenue, because it would otherwise go bankrupt far before it was able to earn more, leaving it unable to pay for anything—even the worthy purchases.

      California finds itself in the same position. Regardless of your position on its revenue streams, it simply must cut down its spending on unnecessary luxuries so it doesn’t collapse before the deeper issues can be addressed. Even if you think more taxes are necessary, there simply won’t be enough money for anything—including the worthwhile programs—if the irresponsible spending doesn’t fall soon. The UC Berkley situation illustrates this perfectly.

      I am a resident and I feel this pain very personally. The legislature recently saw fit to increase my withholding tax rate without my consent, reducing my monthly income. Thousands of people were paid with near-worthless IOUs for weeks. State offices are jam-packed and overworked due to furloughs. Criminals are being released from prison early. User fees on everything from driver’s licenses to parking on state property to annual college tuition are skyrocketing. Ironically, the aforementioned cuts were made to protect the beloved welfare programs that comprise such a large chunk of the state budget, which themselves are in danger of being cut anyway because they’re some of the biggest remaining expenses.

      The state government has been reduced to accounting tricks like postponing payrolls for 24 hours and borrowing money from itself just to try to look solvent. These actions have very real consequences for people like me. Democrats often resist spending cuts on the basis of compassion; if you want to talk in those terms, where’s the compassion for a hardworking man trying to support his family on a single income (We’ve got a 12.5% unemployment rate, remember?)? From my perspective, “compassionate” is not the first word that springs to mind to describe the California government, and even less so when I examine my paychecks (≈10% state income tax) or go to the grocery store (≈9.5% sales tax).

      In many ways, California’s got a lot to offer, but it truly is a Libertarian’s worst nightmare. How we’ll muddle through this I can’t imagine, but at least we can serve as a warning beacon for anyone outside looking in who gets the bright idea to spend without regards to revenue and try to make up the difference by taking from the honest and productive segment of the population.

      • Kristopher says:

        nathaniel: Add 9 dependent exemptions to your w2/w4, and make quarterly estimated tax payments to the IRS for owed federal tax that results from the unusual number of exemptions..

        Send that IOU from last year to them for their state tax bill.

  9. Jim says:

    Hi Marko, I got here from Tam’s. If this is typical of your writing, I think I’ll have to read some more of it.

    Jim

  10. NDR says:

    I would rather UC Berkeley give some courses the axe … it would seem more rational

    http://registrar.berkeley.edu/?PageID=deptabb.html

  11. Heh.

    Clearly classes aren’t hard enough, challenging enough, or interesting enough if these students have time to protest. They should all be enrolled in Macroeconomics, then microeconomics before being allowed to purchase a protester’s permit.

    I was once down Berkeley, walking down the street, and heard two girls in front of me talking.
    “Are you going to the protest today?”
    “Oh, I dunno. What’s it, like, about?”
    “I don’t know, but are you going?”

  12. Flighterdoc says:

    UCLA grad here too – undergrad, MBA, med school…

    I recall when the whining assholes closed the school to protest the war…

    At any rate, lets keep tuition where it is now, and cut back. I suggest we start with the social studies departments, art, theater, music, and since the Bruins can’t seem to get a decent football or basketball team together these days, the sports department as well. Oh, and all those ‘studies’ programs – Chicano studies, african-american studies, womens studies…

    The serious folks (math, sciences, engineering) will be enough to keep the lights on.

    • Matt G says:

      Flighterdoc beat me to the punch, almost word for word:
      “At any rate, lets keep tuition where it is now, and cut back. I suggest we start with the social studies departments, art, theater, music, and since the Bruins can’t seem to get a decent football or basketball team together these days, the sports department as well. Oh, and all those ’studies’ programs – Chicano studies, african-american studies, womens studies…

      The serious folks (math, sciences, engineering) will be enough to keep the lights on.”

  13. Matt G says:

    (Except of course I wouldn’t have known which team play for Berkley, more less their record. I just think we should shut down the athletics department of ANY school that can’t produce within budget.)

  14. Darrell says:

    Some guy in a SUV with Cali plates and Cal/Berkeley license frame pulled in front of me last weekend, then dawdled to the left turn lane; he barely made the light, I didn’t. I honked and flipped him the bird. Felt good. Colorado is swimming with Californicators. 😛

    • Kristopher says:

      well … they’ve shat their beds and don’t want to sleep there. So they will sleep here until they have shat your bed for you as well.

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